After A Car Accident Injury What Does Auto Insurance Cover

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What Does Car Accident Insurance Cover? MN Lawyers

CAR ACCIDENT INSURANCE BENEFITS LAWYER – MN INJURY ATTORNEYS

Car accidents occur in Minnesota every day. There are a lot of cars on the road and people make mistakes, so there are going to be some automobile crashes. Therefore, Minnesota law requires every automobile owner to get insurance for his or her vehicle. But what exactly are you getting when you buy automobile insurance? Have you ever actually READ your insurance policy? You should. Most people don’t find out what’s in their insurance policy until they are injured in a car accident and have to call a lawyer. Our top MN auto insurance lawyers answer people’s questions every day.

You really should read the policy yourself, as well as discuss with your agent whether you have the coverage you need. Meanwhile, here’s a short summary our experienced car insurance lawyers have prepared about WHAT’S IN YOUR AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE POLICY:

Collision Coverage (optional coverage you must ask for): Collision coverage pays to fix or replace your vehicle (the property damage) if your vehicle is damaged in a accident. Your insurance company must pay the cost to repair your vehicle, or the value of the vehicle (in insurance lingo “totaling the vehicle”), whichever is less — minus your deductible. If the accident was NOT your fault, your insurance company will collect the property damage amount from the other driver’s insurance company, and you will be reimbursed your deductible. Our Minnesota car insurance lawyers frequently answer questions about car damage and help our clients through this process. See also How to get paid for the damage to my car.

Liability Coverage (standard coverage in every Minnesota auto policy): This type of insurance coverage applies if you are in a car accident and the accident is YOUR FAULT. Your liability coverage pays for the following:

Property damage to the other vehicle: If you have damaged the other driver’s car, your automobile insurance company will pay to fix or replace that car, up to your policy limits for liability property damage. Bodily Injury (“BI”): If someone is injured in a car accident that is your fault, the injured person may have a claim against you for compensation for his or her damages. The liability portion of your policy pays for any damages the injured person may have — up to your policy limits. Most automobile insurance policies in Minnesota provide a minimum of $30,000 per person/$60,000 per occurrence. However, you should consider increasing this to better protect your assets in case you cause a car accident that seriously injures someone, and because when you purchase more liability coverage you usually get more UM/UIM coverage (see below) to better protect you if you are the victim of a serious car accident. Our MN auto accident insurance lawyers handle liability cases every day, and we would be happy to answer your specific questions.

No-Fault Benefits (standard coverage in every Minnesota auto policy) – also referred to as “PIP” benefits: Minnesota law requires your auto insurance policy to pay the first $20,000 in medical expenses and $20,000 in wage loss benefits if you are injured in a car accident. You are entitled to these benefits REGARDLESS OF WHO IS AT FAULT (hence the name “No-Fault” benefits), and your insurance pays this even if the other driver is completely at fault. This is a complicated concept for many people and our top Minnesota auto accident insurance lawyers discuss no-fault issues with our clients every day. Some insurance companies are more difficult to deal with regarding No-Fault benefits. Our car crash lawyers have experience dealing with No-Fault adjusters from American Family, Farmers Insurance, Progressive Insurance, State Farm, Geico, and most of the other auto insurance companies as well. See also How To Get Medical Bills paid.

Uninsured Motorist Benefits (standard coverage in every Minnesota auto policy) – also referred to as “UM” coverage: If the other driver is at fault but is UNINSURED, or you are struck by a hit & run vehicle, then your car insurance company will pay what the other driver should have paid you in compensation for your injuries. In other words, your auto insurance company will act as if it is insuring the other driver. (The uninsured driver shouldn’t get away Scot-free, however, because it is a crime to drive without insurance, plus your insurance company can sue the other driver to get its money back.) Most often, the amount of coverage you have available for uninsured motorist benefits is the same as what you purchase for liability benefits. Our best car accident insurance lawyers pursue these claims for our clients frequently.

Underinsured Motorist Benefits (standard coverage in every Minnesota auto policy) – also referred to as “UIM” coverage: If the other driver is at fault but doesn’t have enough liability insurance to fully compensate you for your injuries, then you are entitled to UNDERINSURED MOTORIST BENEFITS from your auto insurance company. Your insurance company will pay for your damages not compensated by the at-fault driver, up to your insurance limits for UIM coverage. Like UM coverage, the amount of UIM coverage you have is usually the same as what you purchase for liability benefits. Before you can get underinsurance motorist coverage, you have to settle your case with the other drive and give you insurance company the required notices. Our car accident insurance lawyers know what is required by MN law and have helped hundreds of people with this type of claim.

Call us for a Free Initial Consultation if you have been in a auto accident and would like more information about your insurance coverage. Our personal injury lawyers have more than 25 years’ experience helping hundreds of people in similar situations. Pam Rochlin was formerly a partner at Meshbesher & Spence and was the 2015 president of the Minnesota Women Lawyers organization. We provide big firm experience and small firm attention. Our auto accident lawyers handle cases in Minneapolis, St. Paul, and throughout Minnesota.